Matcelup's Mixed views

nicconoh:

Mathematics, rightly viewed, possesses not only truth, but supreme beauty — a beauty cold and austere, without the gorgeous trappings of painting or music." | Betrand Russell
"Beauty of Mathematics" by Yann Pineill & Nicolas Lefaucheux

(via thereligiousnonbeliever)

stoneybooboo:

museumuesum:

George Ferrandi

it felt like i knew you…, 2012 - ongoing
I ride the NYC subway trains, usually in the evening when the seats are full. I focus on the shape of the space between the person sitting next to me and myself. I attempt to mentally and emotionally re-sculpt that space. In my mind, I reshape it- from the stiff and guarded space between strangers to the soft and yielding space between friends. I direct all my energy to this space between us. When the space palpably changes, and I completely feel like the stranger sitting next to me is my friend, I rest my head on that person’s shoulder…

I love this

(via northerntendencies)

humansofnewyork:

"I worked in mutual funds for most of my life, but I’m in the ministry now." “Why the switch?” “Well, I grew up in The Faith. Then I ended up working on Wall Street. And I actually enjoyed the work a lot. For me it was less about the money and more about the excitement and buzz of going to work everyday. I enjoyed making deals and getting things done. But in the end, I just missed God.”

humansofnewyork:

"I worked in mutual funds for most of my life, but I’m in the ministry now."
“Why the switch?”
“Well, I grew up in The Faith. Then I ended up working on Wall Street. And I actually enjoyed the work a lot. For me it was less about the money and more about the excitement and buzz of going to work everyday. I enjoyed making deals and getting things done. But in the end, I just missed God.”

twentyafterfourrr:

latinly:

symical:


Mercury, Venus, and Saturn align with the Pyramids of Giza for the first time in 2,737 years on December 3, 2012

i’ve never reblogged anything so fast

what the actual

twentyafterfourrr:

latinly:

symical:

Mercury, Venus, and Saturn align with the Pyramids of Giza for the first time in 2,737 years on December 3, 2012

i’ve never reblogged anything so fast

what the actual

(Source: arpleiadian, via seck-c)

stfueverything:

mohandasgandhi:

descentintotyranny:

Watch the hearing here

430 members of Congress find Pakistanis so worthless and inhuman, they can’t even bother showing up to a hearing detailing their unbelievably unjustified massacre. Maybe you might want to ask your representative what was so much more important than correcting vast human rights abuses on your dime. A 9-year-old managed to show up. They have no excuse.

5. fucking. congress. members. FIVE. FIIIIIVVVVE. 5. THAT’S IT. JUST 5.

stfueverything:

mohandasgandhi:

descentintotyranny:

Watch the hearing here

430 members of Congress find Pakistanis so worthless and inhuman, they can’t even bother showing up to a hearing detailing their unbelievably unjustified massacre. Maybe you might want to ask your representative what was so much more important than correcting vast human rights abuses on your dime. A 9-year-old managed to show up. They have no excuse.

5. fucking. congress. members. FIVE. FIIIIIVVVVE. 5. THAT’S IT. JUST 5.

(via thepeacefulterrorist)

stay-human:

I keep seeing this picture and people being oh so impressed by it acting like Dubai’s Sheikhs are miracle workers or some shit. And all that skyline does is make me want to throw up. Do you understand how all of this was built?

…and then there is the foreign underclass who built the city, and are trapped here. They are hidden in plain view. You see them everywhere, in dirt-caked blue uniforms, being shouted at by their superiors, like a chain gang – but you are trained not to look. It is like a mantra: the Sheikh built the city. The Sheikh built the city. Workers? What workers?


Sahinal Monir, a slim 24-year-old from the deltas of Bangladesh. “To get you here, they tell you Dubai is heaven. Then you get here and realise it is hell,” he says. Four years ago, an employment agent arrived in Sahinal’s village in Southern Bangladesh. He told the men of the village that there was a place where they could earn 40,000 takka a month (£400) just for working nine-to-five on construction projects. It was a place where they would be given great accommodation, great food, and treated well. All they had to do was pay an up-front fee of 220,000 takka (£2,300) for the work visa – a fee they’d pay off in the first six months, easy. So Sahinal sold his family land, and took out a loan from the local lender, to head to this paradise.


As soon as he arrived at Dubai airport, his passport was taken from him by his construction company. He has not seen it since. He was told brusquely that from now on he would be working 14-hour days in the desert heat – where western tourists are advised not to stay outside for even five minutes in summer, when it hits 55 degrees – for 500 dirhams a month (£90), less than a quarter of the wage he was promised. If you don’t like it, the company told him, go home. “But how can I go home? You have my passport, and I have no money for the ticket,” he said. “Well, then you’d better get to work,” they replied.


He shows me his room. It is a tiny, poky, concrete cell with triple-decker bunk-beds, where he lives with 11 other men. All his belongings are piled onto his bunk: three shirts, a spare pair of trousers, and a cellphone. The room stinks, because the lavatories in the corner of the camp – holes in the ground – are backed up with excrement and clouds of black flies. There is no air conditioning or fans, so the heat is “unbearable. You cannot sleep. All you do is sweat and scratch all night.” At the height of summer, people sleep on the floor, on the roof, anywhere where they can pray for a moment of breeze.
 "There’s a huge number of suicides in the camps and on the construction sites, but they’re not reported. They’re described as ‘accidents’." Even then, their families aren’t free: they simply inherit the debts. A Human Rights Watch study found there is a “cover-up of the true extent” of deaths from heat exhaustion, overwork and suicide, but the Indian consulate registered 971 deaths of their nationals in 2005 alone. After this figure was leaked, the consulates were told to stop counting.

stay-human:

I keep seeing this picture and people being oh so impressed by it acting like Dubai’s Sheikhs are miracle workers or some shit. And all that skyline does is make me want to throw up. Do you understand how all of this was built?

…and then there is the foreign underclass who built the city, and are trapped here. They are hidden in plain view. You see them everywhere, in dirt-caked blue uniforms, being shouted at by their superiors, like a chain gang – but you are trained not to look. It is like a mantra: the Sheikh built the city. The Sheikh built the city. Workers? What workers?
Sahinal Monir, a slim 24-year-old from the deltas of Bangladesh. “To get you here, they tell you Dubai is heaven. Then you get here and realise it is hell,” he says. Four years ago, an employment agent arrived in Sahinal’s village in Southern Bangladesh. He told the men of the village that there was a place where they could earn 40,000 takka a month (£400) just for working nine-to-five on construction projects. It was a place where they would be given great accommodation, great food, and treated well. All they had to do was pay an up-front fee of 220,000 takka (£2,300) for the work visa – a fee they’d pay off in the first six months, easy. So Sahinal sold his family land, and took out a loan from the local lender, to head to this paradise.
As soon as he arrived at Dubai airport, his passport was taken from him by his construction company. He has not seen it since. He was told brusquely that from now on he would be working 14-hour days in the desert heat – where western tourists are advised not to stay outside for even five minutes in summer, when it hits 55 degrees – for 500 dirhams a month (£90), less than a quarter of the wage he was promised. If you don’t like it, the company told him, go home. “But how can I go home? You have my passport, and I have no money for the ticket,” he said. “Well, then you’d better get to work,” they replied.

He shows me his room. It is a tiny, poky, concrete cell with triple-decker bunk-beds, where he lives with 11 other men. All his belongings are piled onto his bunk: three shirts, a spare pair of trousers, and a cellphone. The room stinks, because the lavatories in the corner of the camp – holes in the ground – are backed up with excrement and clouds of black flies. There is no air conditioning or fans, so the heat is “unbearable. You cannot sleep. All you do is sweat and scratch all night.” At the height of summer, people sleep on the floor, on the roof, anywhere where they can pray for a moment of breeze.

 "There’s a huge number of suicides in the camps and on the construction sites, but they’re not reported. They’re described as ‘accidents’." Even then, their families aren’t free: they simply inherit the debts. A Human Rights Watch study found there is a “cover-up of the true extent” of deaths from heat exhaustion, overwork and suicide, but the Indian consulate registered 971 deaths of their nationals in 2005 alone. After this figure was leaked, the consulates were told to stop counting.

(Source: dubaipicturesgallery, via disciplesofmalcolm)

thepocketprotector:


Just a father and mother kissing their dying little girl goodbye. If you are wondering why all the medic people are bowing: in less than an hour, two small children in the next room are able to live thanks to the little girl’s kidney and liver. - Imgur
“Powerful” isn’t a good enough descriptor for this image series.  

thepocketprotector:

Just a father and mother kissing their dying little girl goodbye. If you are wondering why all the medic people are bowing: in less than an hour, two small children in the next room are able to live thanks to the little girl’s kidney and liver. - Imgur

“Powerful” isn’t a good enough descriptor for this image series.  

(via notyourbatmans)